Journal of Global Infectious Diseases

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2018  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 42--46

Diagnostic accuracy of CD64 for sepsis in emergency department


Silvana Teixeira Dal Ponte1, Ana Paula Alegretti2, Diogo André Pilger3, Gabriela Petitot Rezende4, Giordanna Andrioli1, Helena Cocolichio Ludwig4, Luciano Diogo5, Luciano Zubaran Goldani4, Melina Loreto4, Pauline Simas Machado4, Renato Seligman1 
1 Department of Emergency Medicine, Clinical Hospital of Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, Brazil
2 Department of Clinical Pathology, Clinical Hospital of Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, Brazil
3 Department of Hematology, Clinical Hospital of Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, Brazil
4 Department of Internal Medicine, Clinical Hospital of Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, Brazil
5 Department of Infectology, Clinical Hospital of Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, Brazil

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Silvana Teixeira Dal Ponte
60/600, Mario Leitao St, Porto Alegre
Brazil

Introduction: Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response to suspected or confirmed infection. Clinical evaluations are essential for its early detection and treatment. Blood cultures may take as long as 2 days to yield a result and are not always reliable. However, recent studies have suggested that neutrophil CD64 expression may be a sensitive and specific alternative for the diagnosis of systemic infection. Objective: The objective of the study was to analyze the difference in CD64 values between subjects with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), suspected or confirmed sepsis, who meet diagnostic criteria for SIRS upon arriving at an emergency department. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective observational cohort study, an accuracy study of CD64 prospectively evaluated. The sample consisted of 109 patients aged 18 years with criteria for SIRS on arrival to emergency department. CD64 expression was measured within 6 h of hospital admission and once again after 48 h. Results: ROC curve analysis suggested that a cutoff of 1.45 for CD64 expression could diagnose sepsis with a sensitivity of 0.85, a specificity of 0.75, an accuracy of 82.08%, a positive predictive value of 0.96, a negative predictive value of 0.38 and a positive likelihood ratio of 3.33. The area under the curve was 0.83. Conclusion: CD64 seems to be a useful, sensitive, and specific biomarker in discriminating between SIRS and sepsis.


How to cite this article:
Dal Ponte ST, Alegretti AP, Pilger DA, Rezende GP, Andrioli G, Ludwig HC, Diogo L, Goldani LZ, Loreto M, Machado PS, Seligman R. Diagnostic accuracy of CD64 for sepsis in emergency department.J Global Infect Dis 2018;10:42-46


How to cite this URL:
Dal Ponte ST, Alegretti AP, Pilger DA, Rezende GP, Andrioli G, Ludwig HC, Diogo L, Goldani LZ, Loreto M, Machado PS, Seligman R. Diagnostic accuracy of CD64 for sepsis in emergency department. J Global Infect Dis [serial online] 2018 [cited 2020 Dec 1 ];10:42-46
Available from: https://www.jgid.org/article.asp?issn=0974-777X;year=2018;volume=10;issue=2;spage=42;epage=46;aulast=Dal;type=0