Journal of Global Infectious Diseases

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2019  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 147--152

Burden and molecular epidemiology of Rotavirus causing diarrhea among under-five children: A hospital-based study from Eastern India


Arpit Kumar Shrivastava1, N Samarasimha Reddy2, Sidhartha Giri2, Priyadarshi Soumyaranjan Sahu3, Mirabai Das4, Nirmal Kumar Mohakud5, Rashmi Ranjan Das6 
1 Department of Biotechnology, Infection Biology Laboratory, KIIT Deemed to be University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Division of Gastrointestinal Sciences, The Wellcome Trust Research Laboratory, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India
3 Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Medical University of the Americas, Nevis, WI
4 Department of Health, Kalinga Institute of Social Sciences, KISS University, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India
5 Department of Paediatrics, Kalinga Institute of Medical Sciences, KIIT Deemed to be University, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India
6 Department of Pediatrics, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Nirmal Kumar Mohakud
Department of Paediatrics, Kalinga Institute of Medical Sciences, KIIT Deemed to be University, Bhubaneswar - 751 024, Odisha
India

Background: Rotavirus (RVA) causes severe gastroenteritis in under-five children, and there are many diverse strains of the virus that are localized to different parts of the world. Objectives: To study the burden and molecular epidemiology of RVA causing gastroenteritis among children from Eastern India. Materials and Methods: This hospital-based cross-sectional study included children under-five with gastroenteritis. Demographic and clinical parameters were recorded in a predesigned pro forma. Stool samples collected from these children were initially screened for RVA VP6 antigen by enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Each EIA-positive sample was then subjected to RNA extraction, followed by reverse transcription, and heminested multiplex polymerase chain reaction for genotyping of RVA strains. Results: Of 320 included children, RVA was detected in 30.62% (98/320) cases by EIA. The highest incidence for RVA-positive cases (34.61%) was observed among children in the age group of 24–36 months, followed by 0–12 months (33.04%). Of the 97 completely typed samples, single genotype was detected in 85 (87.62%) samples with either G (VP7) or P (VP4) types. However, mixed genotypes were detected in 12 (11.21%) samples. G3P[8] (44.09%) was the most common genotype, followed by G1P[8] (32.65%), G2[P4] (5.10%), G1[P6] (3.06%), and G9[P4] (1.02%). Conclusions: The present study found RVA positivity in 30.62% of children with gastroenteritis, with the highest burden among 24–36 months old. The predominant genotypes were G1, G3, and P[8]. Further large-scale/multicentric studies should be conducted to document the diversity of circulating RVA genotypes in this region for giving inputs for vaccination strategy.


How to cite this article:
Shrivastava AK, Reddy N S, Giri S, Sahu PS, Das M, Mohakud NK, Das RR. Burden and molecular epidemiology of Rotavirus causing diarrhea among under-five children: A hospital-based study from Eastern India.J Global Infect Dis 2019;11:147-152


How to cite this URL:
Shrivastava AK, Reddy N S, Giri S, Sahu PS, Das M, Mohakud NK, Das RR. Burden and molecular epidemiology of Rotavirus causing diarrhea among under-five children: A hospital-based study from Eastern India. J Global Infect Dis [serial online] 2019 [cited 2020 Jun 6 ];11:147-152
Available from: http://www.jgid.org/article.asp?issn=0974-777X;year=2019;volume=11;issue=4;spage=147;epage=152;aulast=Shrivastava;type=0