Journal of Global Infectious Diseases

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2019  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 63--68

Effect of temperature and altitude difference on tuberculosis notification: A systematic review


Yalemzewod Assefa Gelaw1, Weiwei Yu3, Ricardo J Soares Magalhães2, Yibeltal Assefa3, Gail Williams5 
1 Epidemiology and Biostatistics Division, School of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Science, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia, Australia
2 UQ Spatial Epidemiology Laboratory, Faculty of Science, School of Veterinary Science, The University of Queensland, Gatton; Children's Health and Environment Program, Child Health Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
3 Health Systems and Policy Division, School of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia

Correspondence Address:
Mr. Yalemzewod Assefa Gelaw
Epidemiology and Biostatistics Division, School of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Herston, Brisbane, QLD 4006
Australia

Background: Ecological factors are important indicators for tuberculosis (TB) notification. However, consolidation of evidence on the effect of altitude and temperature on TB notification rate has not yet been done. The aim of this review is to illustrate the effect of altitude and temperature on TB notification rate. Methods: Electronic searches were undertaken from PubMed, EMBASE, and Scopus databases. Hand searches of bibliographies of retrieved papers provided additional references. A review was performed using the Meta-analysis Of Observational Studies in Epidemiology guideline. Results: Nine articles from various geographic regions were included in the study. Five out of nine studies showed the effect of altitude and four articles identified temperature effects. Results showed that TB notification rates were lower at higher altitude and higher at a higher temperature. Conclusion: This review provides qualitative evidence that TB notification rates increase with temperature and decrease with altitude. The findings of this review will encourage policymakers and program managers to consider seasonality and altitude differences in the design and implementation of TB prevention and control strategies.


How to cite this article:
Gelaw YA, Yu W, Magalhães RJ, Assefa Y, Williams G. Effect of temperature and altitude difference on tuberculosis notification: A systematic review.J Global Infect Dis 2019;11:63-68


How to cite this URL:
Gelaw YA, Yu W, Magalhães RJ, Assefa Y, Williams G. Effect of temperature and altitude difference on tuberculosis notification: A systematic review. J Global Infect Dis [serial online] 2019 [cited 2019 Jun 18 ];11:63-68
Available from: http://www.jgid.org/article.asp?issn=0974-777X;year=2019;volume=11;issue=2;spage=63;epage=68;aulast=Gelaw;type=0