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LETTER TO EDITOR  
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 86-87
Strongyloides stercoralis infection: A case series from a tertiary care center in India


1 Department of Medicine and Microbiology, Division of Infectious Disease, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
2 Department of Microbiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India

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Date of Web Publication24-May-2017
 

How to cite this article:
Gupta N, Choudhary A, Mirdha BR, Kale P, Kant K, Ghosh A, Verma N. Strongyloides stercoralis infection: A case series from a tertiary care center in India. J Global Infect Dis 2017;9:86-7

How to cite this URL:
Gupta N, Choudhary A, Mirdha BR, Kale P, Kant K, Ghosh A, Verma N. Strongyloides stercoralis infection: A case series from a tertiary care center in India. J Global Infect Dis [serial online] 2017 [cited 2019 Oct 16];9:86-7. Available from: http://www.jgid.org/text.asp?2017/9/2/86/204694


Sir,

Strongyloidiasis remains a neglected tropical disease as reflected by the paucity of published literature from India.[1],[2] We conducted a retrospective, descriptive study on thirty patients, who were diagnosed with strongyloidiasis in our hospital. The patients were diagnosed using wet mount microscopy. The majority of the patients diagnosed with strongyloidiasis were in the age group of 31–40 years (10/30, 33%). The proportion of diseased males (24/30, 80%) was significantly higher than the females (6/30, 20%). Eighteen of the thirty patients had other coexisting conditions [Table 1]. HIV infection was most commonly associated with strongyloidiasis in our study, which was in concordance with another study from our country.[3] Increasing number of cases with strongyloidiasis reported in transplant settings has encouraged recommendations for a pretransplant screening.[4] The mean number of larvae detected from the samples of immunosuppressed versus immunocompetent patients was 21.7/cover slip area and 2.9/cover slip area, respectively. There were five patients with severe manifestations and increased load of rhabditiform larvae in stool. Four of these five patients with severe manifestations had HIV infection while one was a liver transplant recipient. A definite diagnosis of hyperinfection syndrome was possible in only one of these patients in whom filariform larvae were demonstrated in the tracheal aspirate. The global increase in the number of immunosuppressed individuals coupled with the high parasitic load and severe manifestations noted in these patients suggests that there is a definite need for heightening suspicion, diagnosing early, and promptly treating these patients.
Table 1: Strongyloidiasis Cases in the Last One and Half Decade

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Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

 
   References Top

1.
Khuroo MS. Hyperinfection strongyloidiasis in renal transplant recipients. BMJ Case Rep 2014;2014. pii: Bcr2014205068.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Tiwari S, Rautaraya B, Tripathy KP. Hyperinfection of Strongyloides stercoralis in an immunocompetent patient. Trop Parasitol 2012;2:135-7.  Back to cited text no. 2
[PUBMED]  [Full text]  
3.
Chordia P, Christopher S, Abraham OC, Muliyil J, Kang G, Ajjampur Ss. Risk factors for acquiring Strongyloides stercoralis infection among patients attending a tertiary hospital in South India. Indian J Med Microbiol 2011;29:147-51.  Back to cited text no. 3
[PUBMED]  [Full text]  
4.
Avery RK. Recipient screening prior to solid-organ transplantation. Clin Infect Dis 2002;35:1513-9.  Back to cited text no. 4
[PUBMED]    

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Correspondence Address:
Bijay Ranjan Mirdha
Room No 2078, Department of Microbiology, 2nd Floor, Teaching Block, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi - 110 029
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0974-777X.204694

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2008 Journal of Global Infectious Diseases | Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow
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