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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2011  |  Volume : 3  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 115-122

Genotypic characterization of Staphylococcus aureus obtained from humans and bovine mastitis samples in India


1 Department of Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Pondicherry Central University, Kalapet, Pondicherry, India
2 Laboratory of Molecular and Cell Biology, Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics (CDFD), Hyderabad;National Institute of Nutrition, Hyderabad, India

Correspondence Address:
K Prashanth
Department of Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Pondicherry Central University, Kalapet, Pondicherry
India
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DOI: 10.4103/0974-777X.81686

PMID: 21731296

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Aim and Background: Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen that also causes important infections in cattle and sheep. The present study aimed to test genetic diversity among strains of S. aureus isolated from cattle (n=34) and humans (n=22) by DNA typing. Materials and Methods: Fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism (FAFLP) is the genotyping tool used in the study. The presence of the mecA and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) genes among these strain groups was also checked. Results: A dendrogram deduced from FAFLP showed that all the strains clustered into 10 groups (A-J) with a relative genetic divergence of less than 8%. Sixty-seven percent of the isolates from bovine sources clustered together in two clades (A and H), while another major cluster with 13 isolates (59%) (Cluster G) had all strains from a human host. The remaining strains from both the hosts clustered independently into smaller clusters with the exception of two strains of human origin, which clustered along with a bovine cluster. Thirteen strains belonging to cluster G were highly clonal. About 77% of strains obtained from human infections were methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), whereas only 29% of strains from bovine origin were MRSA. Only three strains from human origin showed PVL positive, while no strain from cattle had PVL genes. The complete absence of PVL genes in all the bovine strains in the study appears to be significant. Conclusions: FAFLP can be successfully applied to assess the genetic relationship of S. aureus isolates from different hosts. The study also provided the valuable epidemiological data on S. aureus from bovine sources in India, which is lacking.


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2008 Journal of Global Infectious Diseases | Published by Medknow
Online since 10th December, 2008