Journal of Global Infectious DiseasesOfficial Publishing of International Infectiologists Network Users online:830  
Print this pageEmail this pageSmall font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size     
Home About us Editors Ahead of Print Current Issue Archives Search Instructions Subscribe Advertise Login 
 
SYMPOSIUM - LIESHMANIASIS
Year : 2010  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 177-185

Leishmaniasis vaccine: Where are we today?


Infection and Immunity Division, Walter+Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, Melbourne, Australia

Correspondence Address:
Lukasz Kedzierski
Infection and Immunity Division, Walter+Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, Melbourne
Australia
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: National Health and Medical Research Council, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0974-777X.62881

Rights and Permissions

Leishmaniasis is a disease that ranges in severity from skin lesions to serious disfigurement and fatal systemic infection. WHO has classified the disease as emerging and uncontrolled and estimates that the infection results in two million new cases a year. There are 12 million people currently infected worldwide, and leishmaniasis threatens 350 million people in 88 countries. Current treatment is based on chemotherapy, which relies on a handful of drugs with serious limitations such as high cost, toxicity, difficult route of administration and lack of efficacy in endemic areas. Vaccination remains the best hope for control of all forms of the disease, and the development of a safe, effective and affordable antileishmanial vaccine is a critical global public-health priority. Extensive evidence from studies in animal models indicates that solid protection can be achieved by immunization with defined subunit vaccines or live-attenuated strains of Leishmania. However, to date, no such vaccine is available despite substantial efforts by many laboratories. The major impediment in vaccine design is the translation of data from animal models to human disease, and the transition from the laboratory to the field. Furthermore, a thorough understanding of protective immune responses and generation and maintenance of the immunological memory, the most important and least-studied aspect of antiparasitic vaccine development, during Leishmania infection is needed. This review focuses on recent findings in antileishmania vaccine field and highlights current difficulties facing vaccine development and implementation.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed9153    
    Printed422    
    Emailed10    
    PDF Downloaded543    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 30    

Recommend this journal

 

Sitemap | What's New | Feedback | Copyright and Disclaimer | Contact Us
2008 Journal of Global Infectious Diseases | Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow
Online since 10th December, 2008